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ADHD in Adults: Behavioral Strategies

ADHD in Adults: Behavioral Strategies

Topic Overview

If you are an adult who has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , you will most likely see an improvement in your symptoms when you take medicine for the condition. Behavioral interventions are not meant to treat inattention, overactivity, or impulsivity. But they can help you be more organized and have healthy interpersonal relationships. The following are some suggestions:

  • Get organized. Most likely you have difficulty with organizational skills. Find a daily organizer or planner that fits your needs. Write notes in your organizer about your appointments and other things you need to remember.
  • Decrease distractions. The environment can be an important part of being organized. Set up your work environment so that there are fewer distractions. You may find using headphones or a "white noise" machine helpful. College students can arrange a quiet living situation, such as a single dormitory room.
  • Stop and think. If you are impulsive, train yourself to stop and think before you act. If you are prone to blurting out statements that you later regret, train yourself to write down the statement and think about whether it should be said out loud. If you have a problem with your temper, use the "stop and think" method. If this does not work, talk with a health professional.
  • Work on relationships. Social skills training can help an adult who has ADHD relate to family, friends, and coworkers. Also, marital counseling or family therapy can significantly improve relationships and overall family function.
  • Find substitute behaviors for hyperactivity. Anticipate situations where you think you may feel restless, and plan ways to keep yourself moving without affecting others. For example, take notes during meetings instead of fidgeting.
  • Seek help. Learn as much as you can about ADHD and how its symptoms affect your life. Explore the Internet to find websites of national organizations for helpful information about the condition. Ask a doctor about local resources or books that may be helpful.

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Louis Pellegrino, MD - Developmental Pediatrics
Current as of March 12, 2014

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

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