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Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia

Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important
It is possible that the main title of the report Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • Carrington's disease
  • CEP
  • ICEP
  • idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Summary
Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is a rare disorder characterized by the massive accumulation of eosinophils in the lungs (pulmonary eosinophilia). Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell and are part of the immune system. They are usually produced in response to allergens, inflammation or infection (especially parasitic ones) and are particularly active in the respiratory tract. In CEP, eosinophils also accumulate in the bloodstream (peripheral eosinophilia). Common symptoms include shortness of breath (dyspnea), cough, fatigue, night sweats, low grade fevers, and unintended weight loss. The exact cause of CEP is unknown (idiopathic).

Introduction
CEP was first described as a distinct entity in the medical literature by Carrington, et al. in 1969 when they described nine individuals with the disorder. It is classified as a form of eosinophilic lung disease, a large group of interstitial lung diseases. CEP is different from acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP), which is marked by rapid onset, the absence of asthma, a greater potential for acute respiratory failure and no relapse following treatment. For more information on AEP, choose "acute eosinophilic pneumonia" as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.

Resources

Center for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Road NE
Atlanta, GA 30333
Tel: (404)639-3534
Tel: (800)232-4636
TDD: (888)232-6348
Email: cdcinfo@cdc.gov
Internet: http://www.cdc.gov/

NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
P.O. Box 30105
Bethesda, MD 20892-0105
Tel: (301)592-8573
Fax: (301)251-1223
Email: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
Internet: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311
TDD: (888)205-3223
Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

Campaign Urging Research for Eosinophilic Disease (CURED)
PO Box 32
Lincolnshire, IL 60069
Tel: (847)793-0071
Email: ellyn@curedfoundation.org
Internet: http://www.curedfoundation.org

Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
3333 Burnet Avenue
MLC 2010
Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039
Tel: (513)636-2233
Fax: (513)636-9069
Tel: (800)344-2462
TDD: (513)636-4900
Email: cced@cchmc.org
Internet: http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/eosinophils

American Partnership for Eosinophilic Disorders
PO Box 29545
Atlanta, GA 30359
Tel: (713)493-7749
Fax: (713)493-7749
Email: mail@apfed.org
Internet: http://www.apfed.org

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  3/1/2012
Copyright  2012 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

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